Advance Home Inspection
Maryland's #1 Home, Lead Paint, Radon and Rental Inspection Company

Towson Home Inspection Information

Advance Home Inspection, LLC is a multi-home inspection firm with same day, next day, and weekend services serving Towson and surrounding areas.

The Inspectors:

  • We are active InterNACHI (InterNational Association of Certified Home Inspectors) and must complete a minimum 24 hours of continuing education per calendar year. Adhere to the "Standards of Practice", abide by its "Code of Ethics".
  • Have completed Certified Training for "Level One Thermography"
  • Have completed Certified Training with BPI
  • All of our home inspectors continue to educate themselves about the ever changing world of Home Inspecting, Home Building, the Green Effort and more...
Each of our Inspectors are educated, certified, and insured to meet and/or exceed the State of Maryland law.

Because we are a professional Baltimore home inspection company, our inspectors are familiar with a wide variety of situations and employ the latest technology and tools. We have the training, expertise, experience, and tools to find and report issues that, if not corrected in time, may lead to expensive repairs.

By using Advanced Home Inspection, LLC, you benefit from experienced, trained, and certified inspectors that deliver reports that meet or exceed national standards. As a company and inspectors, we encourage your presence during your Towson home inspection. By being present at the home inspection our professional inspector can familiarize you with the home and explain things to you as they move through the house.

Call Advanced Home Inspection today at 443-925-9971 or E-mail us at bryant@mdahi.com for your custom home inspection quote. You can also click on this link to book your Towson home inspection online!

Links to Resources in Towson, Maryland:

Towson Town Center - http://www.towsontowncenter.com/
Towson University - http://www.towson.edu/
Baltimore County, Maryland Government - http://www.baltimorecountymd.gov/

Information about Towson, Maryland (from Wikipedia.org):

Towson is an unincorporated community and a census-designated place in Baltimore County, Maryland, United States. The population was 55,197 at the 2010 census. It is the county seat of Baltimore County[1] and the second-most populated unincorporated county seat in the United States (after Ellicott City, Maryland).[2]

On February 13, 1854, Towson became the county seat of Baltimore County by popular vote.[7] The Court House, still in use, was designed by Dixon, Balbirnie and Dixon[8] and completed within a year, constructed of limestone and marble donated by the Ridgely family, on land donated by Towson merchant Grafton Bosley.[4][7] The Courthouse was subsequently enlarged in 1910 through designs for north and south wings by Baldwin and Pennington. Expansion in 1926 and 1958 created an H-shaped plan.[9] The Baltimore County Jail was built in 1855.

From 1850 to 1874, another notable land owner, Amos Matthews, had a farm of 150 acres (0.61 km2) that — with the exception of the 17-acre (69,000 m2) largely natural parcel where the Kelso Home for Girls (currently Towson YMCA), was later erected — was wholly developed into the neighborhoods of West Towson, Southland Hills and other subdivisions beginning in the middle 1920s.[10]

During the Civil War, Towson was the scene of two minor engagements. Many of Towson's citizens were sympathetic to the southern cause, so much so that Ady's Hotel, later the Towson Hotel and the current site of the Recher Theatre, flew a southern flag.[11][12][13] The Union Army found it necessary to overtake the town by force on June 2, 1861.[14] During the raid, the Union army seized weapons from citizens at Ady's Hotel.[14] A local paper, in jest, referred to Towson as the “strongly fortified and almost impregnable city of Towsontown” and downplays the need for the attack, stating, “the distinguished Straw, with only two hundred and fifty men, has taken a whole city and nearly frightened two old women out of their wits.”[14]

The second engagement took place around July 12, 1864 between Union and Confederate forces. On July 10, 1864, a 135-man Confederate cavalry detachment attacked the Northern Central Railway in nearby Cockeysville, under orders from Gen. Bradley T. Johnson. The First and Second Maryland Cavalry, led by Baltimore County native and pre-war member of the Towson Horse Guards, Maj. Harry W. Gilmor, attacked strategic targets throughout Baltimore and Harford counties, including cutting telegraph wires along Harford Road, capturing two trains and a Union General, and destroying a railroad bridge in Joppa, Maryland. Following what became known as Gilmor's Raid, the cavalry encamped in Towson overnight at Ady's Hotel where his men rested and Gilmor met with friends.[11][15] The next day, a large federal cavalry unit was dispatched from Baltimore to overtake Gilmor's forces. Though outnumbered by more than two to one, the Confederate cavalry attacked the federal unit, breaking the federal unit and chasing them down York Road to around current day Woodbourne Avenue within Baltimore City limits.[11][16][17] Gilmor's forces traveled south along York Road as far south as Govans, before heading west to rejoin Gen. Johnson's main force.[18] Following the war, Gilmor served as the Baltimore City Police Commissioner in the 1870s.

The Towson fire of 1878 destroyed most of the 500 block along the York Turnpike causing an estimated $38,000 in damage.[19][20]

During the summer of 1894, the Towson Water Company laid wooden pipes and installed fire hydrants that were connected to an artesian well near Aigburth Vale. On November 2, 1894, Towson was supplied with electric service through connection with the Mount Washington Electric Light and Power Company.[21]

At the beginning of the century, Towson remained largely a rural community. Land continued to be sold by the acre, rather than as home parcels. Most residences lay within Towson proper: no houses existed west of Central Avenue along Allegheny or Pennsylvania avenues, and there were only three homes along the West Chesapeake Avenue corridor.[22]

As the growth of Baltimore's suburbs became more pronounced after World War II, considerable office development took place in Towson's central core area. Many of the large Victorian and colonial-style residences in the vicinity of the Court House were demolished in the 1980s and 1990s for offices and parking.

Towson, MD

Towson, MD